14 mobile marketing trends that will dominate in 2016



Lazy reader (for those who like to listen)
14 mobile marketing trends that will dominate in 2016

1. Instagram ads
2. Mobile video ads
3. Mobile payments
4. Native advertising
5. Proactive personalized information and ads
6. The end of one-size-fits-all content designing
7. Less mobile optimization, more apps
8. Customized human experience inside mobile
9. Vertical video ads
10. Programmatic paid media automation
11. Native social ecommerce integration
12. Mobile marketing via text message
13. Snapchat
14. Mobile marketing automation

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5 Latest Mobile Marketing Trends To Dominate 2016

There’s no doubt about the fact that mobile marketing is definitely the future and the passing year has proved to be the tipping point. Mobile marketing strategies span across all possible industries in this century. Omnipresent the way it has been, the marketers need to be on their toes to adapt and integrate the new ways of mobile marketing in their promotional strategies.
This video is about the top 5 mobile marketing trends setting 2016 on fire.

APP STORE OPTIMIZATION, ASO, DIGITAL MARKETING, MOBILE, MOBILE ADVERTISING, MOBILE MARKETING, MOBILE MARKETING AUTOMATION, MOBILE MARKETING TRENDS, MOBILE VIDEO, MOBILITY, ONLINE MARKETING, VIRTUAL REALITY, MARKETING TRENDS, TRENDS 2016

 

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Mobile AdSpend To Overtake Newspaper AdSpend

Mobile advertising is set to overtake newspaper expenditure in the UK this year and globally in 2016 – a year earlier than previously predicted, according to the latest forecasts from ZenithOptimedia.

According to the report, Advertising Expenditure Forecasts, mobile advertising will grow 38 per cent in 2016 to US$71 billion (£47.3 billion), while newspaper advertising will shrink by 4 per cent to US$68 billion.

New Zealand Mobile AdSpend figures are rather less impressive – the medium currently represents just 3% of interactive adspend, according to IABNZ/PwC figures – but Mobile AdSpend in NZ is showing 132% year on year growth as at Q2 2015.

IABNZ-Mobile-AdSpend-Q2-2015

 

Now would be a really good time to upskill yourself on Mobile.

NZ Smartphone Usage is now nearly universal.

NZ-smartphone-usage-by-age-group-2015

Those statistics in themselves are impressive, but what’s more significant is how the increasingly ubiquitous smartphones are changing Kiwi behaviour.

According to Google’s “Our Mobile Planet” study:

  • 54% of Kiwi smartphone users search on their smartphones every day
  • 65% search for product information, 51% for info about restaurants, pubs and bars and 42% for travel info
  • 81% read or send email via their smartphones
  • 73% access social networks on mobile
  • 59% keep up with the latest news via smartphone
  • 69% watch videos on their phones

And when it comes to local, the smartphone is in its element:

  • 89% of smartphone users have looked for local info on their mobiles
  • 87% have taken action as a result (70% visited the business while 41% actually bought something)

So what do these statistics mean for Kiwi businesses? In his book “The Third Screen“, Chuck Martin points out that “the world gone mobile is not a simple story of technological change, it is a story of fundamental shifts in consumer behaviour that are forever changing the practice of marketing and how you should view its application with your business”.

To help you to understand and master the challenges of the new mobile environment, we’ve created a ten-part online training course:

The Principles & Practice of Mobile Marketing

mobile-header

Here’s what the course covers:

Lesson One: Understanding The Mobile Consumer & The New Mobile Environment

Consumers’ expectations have changed dramatically in recent years. Now that so many have become so quickly accustomed to anywhere anytime access to information and services in their moment of need, you’d better be ready and able to fulfil those expectations – or see your business slip away to those who can.

In this first lesson, we explore:

  • the changing behaviours of untethered consumers (according to eMarketer, more than 2 hours a day, 20 percent of consumer time, is now being spent on mobile)
  • the switch from Real Time to All The Time Instant Gratification and the implications for Kiwi marketers
  • the “snacking” behaviour of the new mobile consumer, who will watch short video clips while waiting for a bus or check email on the way to a meeting
  • new instant messaging behaviour, chatting with friends halfway around the world through applications such as Viber

In marketing-speak, we’ve moved from one-to-many mass marketing to highly personalised one-to-one. If you’re going to move into the consumer’s personal mobile space, you’d better be ready to switch from interruption marketing to far more inclusive communications methods.

Lesson Two: Mobile-Optimised Websites, Email, Video, Content

If you’ve ever tried in vain to touch and click on a small link on a page not optimised for mobile, then you’ll understand what we’re talking about when we tell you that your communications with your mobile-enabled customers need to be in formats that work for small screens and big thumbs. Similarly, if you’ve been obliged to work your way agonisingly through an online registration form, carefully hunting and pecking the right keys on a tiny onscreen keyboard, just to find out shipping costs, you’ll understand why simplified logins are essential (and why new services such as MapMyID are springing up to offer easy mobile form-filling using previously-supplied information).

In Lesson Two we examine:

  • how best to modify your materials to make them responsive to the demands of the hundreds of different models of smartphones out there, across multiple operating systems
  • reviewing your website processes to make them mobile-friendly
  • adding click-to-call and instant messaging capabilities
  • considering location-aware services to guide consumers to your nearest outlet or office
  • the new importance of the first few words in email subject lines (typically that’s all that consumers have to judge whether or not to open your email)
  • the return of small, fast-loading images
  • short video clips, optimised for fast downloading and stutter-free viewing

Lesson Three: Mobile Search

Google is reporting more than 1000% growth in search on mobile devices in the past three years. With more and more users relying on mobile search and research indicating that around 73% of mobile searches turn into action, it’s essential for marketers to understand and master mobile search.

In this lesson, you’ll learn about:

  • why the first few positions on search results are more vital than ever in a small-screen world
  • advanced mobile search advertising options such as including maps or “click to call” buttons featured in your search results
  • ads contingent on location-based criteria such as physical location that the search is made from (eg searching for “hotels” while in Wellington)
  • inferred intent (eg searching for “hotels” after having previously searched for “trip to Wellington” and “best deals flights Wellington”)
  • developing mobile ad copy that changes based on time of day or location of the searcher
  • the search implications of the new breed of voice-triggered search facilitators, such as Siri and Google Now
  • Google Voice Search
  • the search implications of image recognition technologies such as Google Goggles

Lesson Four: Mobile Messaging

The humble SMS text-messaging facility has been joined on smartphones by a new breed of mobile messaging apps, such as Instagram, Snapchat, Viber and Tango. These new image- and video-based services have in many cases taken over the key functionality of email, enabling consumers to quickly talk amongst themselves and share their lives in real time.

In Lesson Four, we talk about:

  • the appeal, especially to Millennials, of these sorts of private messaging services
  • the marketing implications and opportunities
  • privacy considerations, taking into account both NZ’s Unsolicited Electronic Messages Act and the US’s new Telephone Consumer Protection Act
  • common messaging metrics, which include those similar to email campaign metrics, such as open rate, click-through rates, and response rates

Lesson Five: Location-Based Marketing

More than 30% of all internet searches are local (and include the location in their search); and 73% of online activity is related to local content.  Not surprisingly, mobile provides rich opportunities for marketers to turn much of this local interest into activity: 82% of local searches result in an in-store visit, phone call or purchase.

In Lesson Five, we examine a number of location-based topics, including:

  • the possibilities and pitfalls of QR Codes
  • how technologies such as NFC (as used in bus passes and credit cards that are simply waved at payment terminals) and even Bluetooth enable marketers to tailor messages to consumer locations
  • the combined power of preference, presence, permission and proximity
  • how marketers are using augmented reality to drive engagement
  • push notifications (eg consumers opting in to receive special offers when they are in close proximity to your location)
  • what geofencing is and how it can be used effectively
  • the power of truly local search

Lesson Six: The changing face of Social & Mobile

More than 1.3 billion Facebook users (88% of the social network’s monthly active user base) now connect to the social network through their mobile devices. And US$2.9 Billion, 76% of Facebook’s Q2 2015 revenues, came from mobile. Sixty percent of Twitter users are on mobile.  Social and Mobile are closely entwined. As eMarketer noted recently, “the key opportunity for marketers in the shift toward mobile is that mobile users not only log in more frequently, but they also spend more total time on social media sites. As devices integrate social media more deeply, such as by making it easier to upload photos from a mobile phone to a social site, it strengthens the mobile-social virtuous circle.”

In Lesson Six, you’ll discover:

  • why the links you share across social media channels now need to be optimised for mobile
  • how your connections are viewing your social media updates through mobile apps (and the implications for your content)
  • how to choose the best days and times to post social media messages, now that your recipients are consuming most via mobile
  • design implications for social mobile posts

Lesson Seven: Mobile Advertising

Why advertise on mobile? In a nutshell, it’s where the eyeballs are. As an article in The Atlantic reported, “consumers are spending 10% of their media attention on their mobile devices while the medium only commands a mere 1% of total ad-spend.”

In Lesson Seven, we talk about:

  • how Google and Facebook already make it easy for you to use their platforms to reach their users on mobile
  • how dedicated services such as Snakk Media will smooth your path as well
  • what you should know about mobile ad networks, ad exchanges and “the natives” (companies that are trying to find a native approach to mobile advertising)
  • the types of inventory currently available for mobile advertising (and which may be right for you)
  • key mobile advertising trends to watch for in the year ahead

Lesson Eight: Mobile Apps

At the beginning of 2012, according to an eConsultancy/Experian study, 67% of ad agencies and 57% of marketers surveyed were already planning to make use of mobile apps and technologies. Three years on, what has the industry learned and what examples and case studies are available?

In Lesson Eight, we examine:

  • what apps can do for marketers
  • how brands are using apps effectively
  • what you need to consider before you brief an app developer
  • the key tactical questions to consider: how will you build, manage, run, deploy and secure any apps?
  • conversion rates for in-app promotions, by format and by category
  • the privacy implications inherent in the data you collect about app users

Lesson Nine: Mobile Commerce

Mobile commerce has transformed the way that consumers shop. As we’ve already indicated, consumers have been quick to use their mobile phones for shopping. Sometimes, they do so when they’re in a retail store; however more than 60% of those who buy via their mobile device also do so within the comfort of their own home, a trend PayPal has dubbed “couch commerce”. Consumers have even been known to browse via mobile and then complete the purchase instore.

In Lesson Nine, we delve into mobile commerce in depth, reporting on:

  • the 10 most important ways in which consumers are using their mobile phones to shop online more effectively
  • mobile commerce strategies used by online retailers
  • the ways in which mobile message alerts from retailers impact shopping decisions
  • mobile shopping apps
  • the most popular categories for mobile payments
  • paying via mobile and booking by mobile
  • processing payments via mobile, and using tablets & mobile devices at POS

Lesson Ten: Mobile Analytics & The Future of Mobile

Finally, in Lesson Ten we look at the numbers and peer into the future. We turn our attention first to mobile analytics, and discuss how they can be used, what should be measured and what tools exist to help you track and crunch. Then we look at some of the attention-getting developments of today and tomorrow, including:

  • the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) trend and its implications for security and privacy within your business
  • location-based sensor fusion and the opportunities likely to arise as a result
  • the most interesting devices of 2016 – they won’t come in a box, they’ll be wearable, connectable, and maybe even fashionable
  • the likelihood that your phone will know what you want before you do – push messaging (from the likes of Google Now, MindMeld and Urban Airship) will employ your past behaviour to predict your next move
  • the steps you can (and must) take to reinvent your business processes for mobile

COURSE CREATION AND TUTORING
This course has been created and is tutored by Michael Carney.

WHO SHOULD TAKE THE COURSE
Any Business Owner, Manager, Marketing, Advertising, PR or Communications professional who wants to keep up with the latest developments in the Mobile Marketing sphere.

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TIMING

This course begins on Monday October 5 2015.

INVESTMENT

This ten-part eCourse is available for $597 +GST. However we offer a special $100 Early Bird Discount for bookings received and payment made by midnight on Monday September 28. Pay only $497 +GST for this course!

Bookings are confirmed on receipt of payment, which can be by cheque, bank deposit or credit card. We can raise an invoice in advance if you need it.

To reserve your place in this course, please pay by credit card through PayPal by clicking here.

You will be billed in the name of Netmarketing Services Limited.

If you would prefer to pay by cheque or bank deposit, or require an invoice, please send an email to michael@netmarketingcourses.co.nz with your requirements.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?

You’ll receive our emailed confirmation of your booking. Then on the first day of the course we’ll follow up with details of your Login and Password, along with an Enrolment Key for the Mobile Marketing eCourse.

Google To Penalise Sites That Are Not Mobile-Friendly

Google has been warning the business community for months that websites now need to be mobile-friendly. Tomorrow, it’s crunch time.

If your website isn’t mobile-friendly, expect it to be demoted in search results on smartphones from tomorrow, April 21, as Google rolls out its latest algorithm update.

The new algorithm will give priority to mobile-friendly websites, rewarding those who’ve made the change and punishing those still stuck in a desktop-bound world.

Here’s how Google announced the update, back in February:

More mobile-friendly websites in search results
Starting April 21, we will be expanding our use of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. This change will affect mobile searches in all languages worldwide and will have a significant impact in our search results. Consequently, users will find it easier to get relevant, high quality search results that are optimized for their devices.

It’s an update that makes complete sense to anyone who has ever visited a website through a mobile device and then found the site virtually unusable.

Is your website mobile-friendly?Image source: www.andupdatemywebsite.com

Common Website Problems

These are the most common problems on websites that aren’t optimised for mobile devices:

  • The text is too small to read
  • Website visitors need to pinch, swipe or zoom to see important content (New Rule: If you have to zoom in, it’s not mobile-friendly)
  • Links and any elements that you need to touch are not thumb-friendly and are too close together (i.e. too easy for humans with fat fingers to accidentally click on the wrong thing)
  • Your website uses flash or other technologies that don’t play well on some mobile devices
  • The site doesn’t load within 3 seconds (mobile users are time-sensitive, and will quickly move on)
  • The content is wider than the mobile screen
  • The site is full of long, dense copy rather than designed for snacking with short paragraphs and lots of images
  • To make any transactions through the site, visitors need to fill in long, complicated forms (always difficult on those tiny keyboards)
  • There is a mobile version but it’s not correctly configured

So why is Google making this change? Why now?

Andrew Gazdecki, writing in Business2Community, highlights the inevitable fact that mobile search will hit the tipping point any moment now:

According to predictions by Google, mobile searches (at 85.9 billion) will surpass desktop searches (84 billion) in 2015

Google isn’t just guessing that consumers prefer mobile-friendly websites. Nekhia Christian comments on recent Google research:

For the last year or so, Google has been developing and testing software that can look at the code of a website and determine whether or not the website has been optimized for mobile devices. If you’ve used Google search on a mobile device lately, you may have noticed that they’ve started adding “Mobile-friendly” labels to the results.

mobile-friendly-flagged-by-Google
Image source: www.andupdatemywebsite.com

Tracking this “Mobile-Friendly” label experiment has proven to Google that helping searchers find “mobile-friendly” results is a winning strategy: mobile searchers prefer “mobile-friendly” search results.

Therefore, the next logical step is to show them only “mobile-friendly” search results. And that is exactly what this new “mobile-friendly” algorithm is going to do.

A few key points to keep in mind about this mobile-friendly, algorithm update:

  • It affects searches done on mobile devices only — not searches done on a laptop or desktop computer.
  • It is applied on a page by page basis, not site-wide, so it may be that some of your pages will be affected while others won’t.
  • This evaluation of “mobile-friendliness” is done not by humans, but by Google’s computers, so it’s possible (though unlikely) for a website to look fine on mobile devices, but still be dinged by Google.

How to test if your site is Mobile-Friendly

Here’s what Google advises:

Check out Google’s guide to mobile-friendly sites. If you’re a webmaster, you can get ready for this change by using the following tools to see how Googlebot views your pages:

  • If you want to test a few pages, you can use the Mobile-Friendly Test.
  • If you have a site, you can use your Webmaster Tools account to get a full list of mobile usability issues across your site using the Mobile Usability Report.

Oh, and we would be remiss if we didn’t recommend that you also check out our own ten-part Principles & Practice of Mobile Marketing online training course.

Through the course, you’ll learn:

  • How to understand the mobile consumer and the new mobile environment
  • How to optimise your website, your emails, your video and other content for viewing on mobile
  • How to understand and master mobile search
  • How mobile messaging has changed consumer behaviour (and what that means for marketers)
  • The rich opportunities provided by location-based marketing
  • The implications for marketers now that Social Media is primarily accessed via mobile devices
  • Mobile Advertising and what you should know about mobile ad networks, ad exchanges and “the natives” (companies that are trying to find a native approach to mobile advertising)
  • What mobile apps can do for marketers – and what you need to consider before you even start
  • How mobile commerce has transformed the way that consumers shop
  • What mobile analytics you can and must track
  • The steps you should take to reinvent your business processes for mobile
  • The future of mobile: what to look for and pitfalls to avoid

It’s Way Past Time To Go Mobile

Worldwide, half of Google’s searches have gone mobile. Locally, the proportion of mobile users is far higher, especially if your target audience is under fifty.

NZ smartphone ownership by age group

Don’t waste another moment – get your website mobile NOW!

Will You Continue To Fail On Mobile In 2015?

It seems so unnecessary to point out that we now live in a mobile world — and yet every day we come across organisations that are failing miserably on mobile devices.

Does it matter, you ask? Why make a big deal about it?

Let’s take a look at some numbers.

NZ smartphone ownership by age group

According to TNS Connected Life (July 2014), smartphones are now wielded by:

  • 83% of Kiwis 16-24
  • 74% of Kiwis 25-34
  • 73% of Kiwis 35-44
  • 55% of Kiwis 45-54
  • 47% of Kiwis 55-65

In other words, if your target market is under 45, at least three-quarters of them already use smartphones (and that number simply keeps climbing).

And exactly how do Kiwis use their devices?

Not just to call or text someone (though we figure you already know that).

Kiwis now spend 5 hours/day online, according to TNS Connected Life, with 1.5 of those hours spent online via Mobile.

And Google’s Our Mobile Planet NZ (August 2013 data, so expect the numbers to be even bigger now) reveals that:

  • 89% of Kiwi smartphone owners have looked for local information via their smartphones
  • 87% have taken action as a result
  • 81% read or send email via their smartphones
  • 73% access social networks on mobile
  • 69% watch videos on their phones
  • 65% research products on their smartphones
  • 54% search on their smartphones every day
  • 35% research on mobile and then buy instore
  • 38% research on mobile and then buy online

So what do these statistics mean for Kiwi businesses? In his book “The Third Screen“, Chuck Martin points out that “the world gone mobile is not a simple story of technological change, it is a story of fundamental shifts in consumer behaviour that are forever changing the practice of marketing and how you should view its application with your business”.

Are You Making These Common Mobile Marketing Mistakes?

So how exactly are Kiwi organisations failing on mobile? Here are some typical mistakes by NZ brands:

1. Your website isn’t optimised for mobile.
Take a cold, hard look at your website through your smartphone:

  • Is the text easy to read — or too small?
  • Do visitors need to pinch or swipe to see important content?
  • Are links thumb-friendly (i.e. easy for humans with fat fingers to click on, without accidentally clicking on something else)?
  • Does your website use flash or other technologies that don’t play well on some mobile devices?
  • Does it load within 3 seconds (mobile users are time-sensitive, and will quickly move on)?
  • Is it designed for snacking with short paragraphs and lots of images (long, dense copy is a no-no)?
  • Does it require recipients to fill in long forms (always difficult on those tiny keyboards)?

2. Your emails are not designed for mobile.
As we saw above, the vast majority of smartphone owners check their emails on their devices. Your emails won’t survive long enough to be read if:

  • The Sender Name is unfamiliar or obscure
  • The first 25-30 characters of the Subject Line (which are all that are displayed on most smartphones) don’t entice the recipient to read further
  • The first half of the line of your email (also displayed in the email preview panel) similarly doesn’t encourage further reading

Even if you do get your emails opened, they won’t last long if:

  • They don’t get to the point quickly
  • They’re too difficult to read (because of formatting or intricate word choices)

We could go on — those are just the most obvious of the many mobile sins committed by marketers — but hopefully you get the idea.

Of course, we aren’t flagging those problems just to tut-tut and send you on your way. We do have a solution, to help bring you up to speed: our ten-part Principles & Practice of Mobile Marketing online training course.

Through the course, you’ll learn:

  • How to understand the mobile consumer and the new mobile environment
  • How to optimise your website, your emails, your video and other content for viewing on mobile
  • How to understand and master mobile search
  • How mobile messaging has changed consumer behaviour (and what that means for marketers)
  • The rich opportunities provided by location-based marketing
  • The implications for marketers now that Social Media is primarily accessed via mobile devices
  • Mobile Advertising and what you should know about mobile ad networks, ad exchanges and “the natives” (companies that are trying to find a native approach to mobile advertising)
  • What mobile apps can do for marketers – and what you need to consider before you even start
  • How mobile commerce has transformed the way that consumers shop
  • What mobile analytics you can and must track
  • The steps you should take to reinvent your business processes for mobile
  • The future of mobile: what to look for and pitfalls to avoid

NOW is the ideal time to sign up for our Mobile Marketing course.

For full details of our Mobile Marketing course, and to sign up and save $100, click here.

Award-Winning Campaign in the Mobile Category

This campaign by FCB New Zealand for Unicef, shortlisted in two Mobile categories (charities and response/real-time activity), has just picked up Silver at Cannes:

According to StopPress, the campaign was also awarded a Yellow Pencil at D&AD earlier this year.

This is a smart campaign, leveraging one of the most popular image-posting categories (food), linking it to a real need and then encouraging social sharing through the usual channels.

 

Creativity matters in mobile advertising more than ever

There’s a classic meme in advertising that goes something like this:

“love the ad, but please make the logo a bit more prominent”

Turns out that’s exactly what we should be doing when it comes to mobile advertising, according to “Mobile Manifesto“, a new report by the U.S. Interactive Advertising Bureau and Millward Brown set for release today.

logo

Key insight from the study, as reported by AdWeek: marketers need to clearly brand their mobile ads with a logo, while utilizing pithy copy that offers something valuable in exchange for their engagement.

That may not be rocket science, but the study, drawn from 15 in-depth interviews with Cannes judges and ad agencies (including Chiat Day, FCB, JWT, R/GA and Digitas) identified a number of requirements specific to mobile:

For instance, mobile ad copy should only encompass 50 percent of the frame, while the promos should avoid complex viewing experiences that may take a toll on consumers’ smartphone battery and data availability, as well as their time. The report also advises brands to limit their ad to a pair of phrases—the offer and tagline, in most cases.

Here are five findings and suggestions from the Mobile Manifesto study:

  • the best mobile ads increase brand awareness by 20 percent, lift brand favourability by 14 percent and push purchase intent by 14 percent
  • results jump when mobile ads offer coupons, games and premium content
  • brands should place their logo in the corner of the mobile ad frame
  • use at least one bright colour, but no more than two in the ad
  • highlight calls to action with a bright colour

If you’d like to see how this mobile marketing wisdom translates into real life, take a look at these case studies from the Mobile Marketing Association.

And if you’d like to learn how to master Mobile Marketing for yourself (in the context of the New Zealand marketplace), check out our Mobile Marketing online training course.

 

10 Reasons Why This Is, Finally, The Year Of The Mobile

It’s finally here — the Year of the Mobile!

Yeah, we know you’re skeptical. Go ahead, have a Tui moment — we’ll wait.

Got that off your chest? Good. Now bear with us as we explain why 2014 will finally be the year when Mobile matters, particularly to marketers. We’ve even made a little list for you:

ten-reasons

10 reasons why you need to learn about Mobile Marketing in 2014

  1. Two-thirds of Kiwis now have smartphones. By May 2013, 60% of us now had smartphones and 19% had tablets (TNS Mobile Life). More than half a year on, what do you expect that number will be as we head into 2013? (We’re picking that at least two-thirds of us now have the little, and not so little, devices crammed into our pockets and purses).
  2. Where once the humble feature phone (not so smart) merely allowed us to be contacted anytime, anywhere by voice or text, the smartphone opens the door to always-on emails (81% of us read our emails on the devices, according to Google’s Our Mobile Planet NZ study in May 2013).
  3. 54% of Kiwi smartphone users search on their smartphones every day (Our Mobile Planet). That’s way more significant than it sounds: they’re looking for product information, shopping details, travel & restaurant and pub information and Google knows what else! If your website looks lousy on a smartphone, you just lost half your prospective customers.
  4. There’s no such thing as downtime anymore. If they have to wait for a bus or a train or a meeting (or a commercial break), today’s consumers use their phones to “snack”, grabbing short video clips, playing Candy Crush and other games, reading emails, posting social updates, texting or using messaging apps to connect with friends and whanau, read news items or just read a book on their Kindle app. Apart from the social implications of people glued to small screens rather than interacting with those around them (admit it, you’re as guilty as the rest of us!), there are commercial problems/opportunities as well: how can you help consumers fill in that time (or are you happy for your competitors to do so)?
  5. If your business is local, you should have gone mobile long ago: 89% of Kiwi smartphone users have looked for local info on their mobiles and 87% have taken action as a result (70% visited the business while 41% actually bought something). What does “going mobile” mean for local businesses? Making sure your website is mobile-ready — and that you have a Google+ page with key info on it, including opening hours and address details.
  6. Google has begun to penalise businesses that don’t have mobile-friendly websites that load fast. Google’s aim: pages that load to mobile devices in less than one second. Sound impossible? Perhaps — but what Google wants, smart businesses do their best to deliver.
  7. This next one’s from Forbes Magazine: Users are more likely to ask a question into a mobile device than type in keywords and Google is now prepared to deliver those answers. For this reason, it’s important each business take a step back and ask themselves what questions a consumer would ask that would lead them to their website. Site content should answer questions like, “Where do I find a good plumber?” or “What’s the best Mexican restaurant near my house?” This can be done, in large part, through ensuring contact information, directions, and other frequently asked questions are addressed clearly and accurately.
  8. Mobile software apps like Google Now learn by watching consumer behaviour and then making suggestions based on the data they collect. Google Now uses data from multiple sources to help predict what information users need. For example, if a user has a Google Calendar entry for a dentist appointment, Google Now can check traffic and suggest when to leave. And if they have relevant searches saved in their Google Web History, such as for their favorite team or for upcoming flights, Google Now can show cards for sports scores, flight status, and more. As you might imagine, if Google doesn’t know about your business (yes, through your Google+ account), you won’t be a recommended solution.
  9. Remember that holy grail of Mobile, location-based marketing? It’s here, if not quite in the fashion we expected. Encourage your customers to sign up for notifications (using apps such as Shopkick or iBeacon) and — when they come near your store — send them a location-based notification, telling them what special goodies you have for them. Yes, it’s permission-based, and you mustn’t misuse it (by shouting at them incessantly or offering rubbish incentives), but it’s a powerful tool, just like we always thought.
  10. Should you go for an app or simply make your website mobile-responsive? Most marketers want apps, but they’re expensive and time-consuming to develop (and you still have to sweet-talk consumers to download them, even if they’re free) — so put your effort first into that website. Incidentally, according to Vodafone, New Zealand is still dominated by iOS devices, but it is expected in the next few years that the balance will swing in favour of Android (as is happening elsewhere in the world). So if you do decide you want to release an app, develop for iOS first but follow up with an Android version, sooner rather than later.

There’s lots more, but we think we’ve said enough. For more facts and figures, and an extensive list of what you need to know about Mobile Marketing NOW (this being the year of it and all!), check out the details of our Mobile Marketing course here.